When did Sir Stamford Raffles arrived in Singapore?

What Sir Stamford Raffles did for Singapore?

We recognise him as the man who founded modern Singapore 200 years ago. In 1819, Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles signed a treaty with the Sultan of Johor, granting the British East India Company rights to set up a trading post in Singapore.

Who are the 2 founders of Singapore?

They were namely Sir Stamford Raffles, the recognised founder of Modern Singapore, William Farquhar and John Crawfurd, the first two Residents of Singapore.

Who came to Singapore 1819?

A formal treaty was signed on 6 February 1819 and modern Singapore was born. When Raffles arrived, it was estimated that there were around 1,000 people living in the whole of the island of Singapore, mostly local groups that would become assimilated into Malays and a few dozen Chinese.

What did crawfurd do for Singapore?

He collected revenue from opium and arrack farms and also introduced licenses for pawnbrokers and the manufacture and sale of gunpowder. As a vigorous proponent of free trade, Crawfurd abolished anchorage and other port fees, making Singapore unique as a port that was free from tariffs and port charges.

How did William Farquhar contribution to Singapore?

He managed to attract traders, settlers and supplies to Singapore, and administered the settlement on a shoestring budget. To raise revenue for the settlement, he took pragmatic measures such as allowing gambling dens and auctioning monopoly rights to sell opium and spirits.

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What was Singapore called before 1965?

Early Singapore was called “Temasek”, possibly a word deriving from “tasik” (Malay for lake or sea) and taken to mean Sea-town in Malay.

Why did Britain choose Singapore?

By then, Raffles and his party had concluded in a survey that Singapore was an ideal location. Not only did it have abundant drinking water and a natural sheltered harbour formed by the mouth of the Singapore River, the island was also strategically placed along the British trade route leading to the Straits of China.